HoZmas, Day 31: Staff picks

  

HoZmas, Day 31: Staff picks

This year, we'll be feting the holiday season with our very own HoZmas celebrations. Check back every day in December for free ebooks, huge ebook discounts and the chance to get your hands on some very covetable goodies. Our ebook offers are available until 6 January 2018.

For the final day of HoZmas 2017, we're reflecting on the years gone by with the Head of Zeus staff picks. Get SF, thrillers, classics, historical fiction and more for 90% and end the year with your new favourite. Just enter code HoZ-mas90 at checkout in our eBookstore.
 
 
 
First Man in Rome:  Colleen McCullough may be best remembered for her global multi-million bestseller The Thorn Birds, but I think her muti-volume history of the late Roman Republic is her masterwork. First Man in Rome is the first of the monumental (epic just doesn't do it justice) Masters of Rome series that mixes gossip, politics and war as Rome transforms itself from city state to world power.
--Nicolas, Publisher
 
The Paper Menagerie: Lyrical prose meets magical and original short story concepts. The best literary short story, the best crime thriller short story and the best science fiction short story ever written, all in one collection, plus some of the best writing I’ve ever known. 
--Blake, Communications Manager
 
Too Like the Lightning: The best science fiction I read in 2017. More packed with ideas than most non-fiction and with a cracking story to drive it along, it made me think about family, identity, power structures, work & leisure, happiness, belief systems and humanity. And how can you resist a story packed with tiny soldiers, living toys and an array of characters so gorgeous you'd struggle not to fancy at least one of them?
--Jessie, Art Director
 
A Jest of God: A classic masterpiece that inspired writers such as Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro. Published in 1960's Canada, this book deals with the issues of daughterhood, ageing, spinsterhood and feminism. A quietly, biting book that resonates with today. 
--Jenni, Sales Manager
 
Dogs of War: Don't be fooled into thinking this book is solely for sci-fi fans. If you love intelligent, humorous, and gripping writing, packed with wonderful characters and moral and ethical debate then this book is entirely for you. Adrian is an Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning writer, but his books speak beyond the science to what it really means to be human. And I dare you not to love Rex, the biogenetically-engineered war dog who narrates.
--Chrissy, Account Manager
 
Suspicion: A great thriller than grips you from the first page to the last with twists and turns a plenty.  Danny is trying keep his daughter in her expensive private school despite not having the money he used to and reluctantly accepts a loan from her best friend's very wealthy father.  Feeling guilty and worried about where the money comes from Danny becomes starts checking up on his new found friend and before you know you are knee deep in Government agents, double agents and Mexican drug cartels with a penchant for chainsaws.  Like all great thrillers it's keeps your turning the pages until you reach the grand stand ending that finally reveals who the good guys really are, but will they be able to out smart the baddies....?
--Ian, Financial Director
 
Find Me: I've read a lot of thrillers and can usually guess the twist - but not this time! Find Me is fiendishly clever and brilliantly gripping. I loved it.
--Laura, Publishing Director
 
The Summer House Party: A beautifully written novel, which paints a vivid picture of life between the two World wars.  A gripping saga of forbidden love, tragedy and betrayal.  Perfect to curl up with after Christmas, and will particularly appeal to fans of Elizabeth Jane Howard's Cazalet series.
--Suzanne, Communications Director
 
The Beast: Very timely, incredibly funny and brilliantly observed satire on the newspaper trade from a man who was once inside the belly of the beast. Newspapers like The Daily Beast shape and distort all our daily lives whether we read them or not -- so I urge you to read 'The Beast' to understand how. You might even, as I did, come away with a new, grudging respect for the inky-fingered hacks and subs of Fleet Street. 
--Ian, Account Manager
 
419: At once a chilling thriller about a lonely woman avenging her father's death and an epic portrait of morality and corruption across the globe, 419 is a beautifully written novel about the world's most insidious Internet scam.
--Geo, Digital Production Manager
 
False Lights: An exquisitely written novel – masterful storytelling brimming with tension and political intrigue. Hester and Crow are brought so vividly to life that they stay with you long after the book has finished. 
--Sophie, Assistant Editor
 
In White Ink: Elske Rahill's debut collection of short stories exquisitely captures what it is to be a woman. The underlying theme that ties together the stories is motherhood, but I challenge any woman not to see herself reflected in at least one character. From the deluded to the brave, the lost and loyal, the characters are written so vividly, and the situations they inhabit so compelling that you'll want to re-read this collection as soon as you finish it. 
--Clare, Communications Executive

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