Books of the year from Head of Zeus

  

Books of the year from Head of Zeus

As we approach the end of the year, round-ups of the best books of 2017 have begun to appear and HoZ titles are not disappointing. With titles spread across our imprints, there's something for everyone.
 
Mary Hollingworth's history of Florence's most infamous dynasty was one of the Telegraph's top 50 books of 2017. '[Conjuring] up a world of art, literature, philosophy - and brutality', it's a perfect pick for any history fan. 
 
For Medieval warriors, pilgrims, bankers and heretics combined in one powerful religious order, look no further than Dan Jones' The Templars. The Times and the Sunday Times both picked it for their history books of the year, commending Jones' skills as not only 'an entertainer, but also a bona fide historian' and at crafting 'rip-roaring medieval narratives [with] few peers.'
 
It should be difficult to follow a million-copy bestseller that spawned a Pulitzer Prize-winning hip-hop musical, but Ron Chernow has pulled it off with panache. It was one of historian Simon Sebag Montefiore's top books of the year: in the Evening Standard he called it 'a superb, compelling biography that redefines the alcoholic failure who became Abraham Lincoln's victorious general and a fine president.'
 
If you prefer your history less political and more literary, why not follow John Kerrigan's suit in the TLS. Picking Declan Kiberd's exploration of Irish life and letters since 1945, he commended its 'perceptive, capacious account [which] looks back with wit and regret from the disappointments of austerity.' 
 
Fans of Dickensian epics need look no further than Min Jin Lee's sprawling multi-generational masterpiece set in 20th-century Korea and Japan. If you still need reason to read it, Erica Wagner picked it for her book of the year in New Statesman, calling it 'utterly astonishing... an epic family saga.' 
 
Ken Bruen's latest Jack Taylor outing caught the eye of The Times' Marcel Berlins. Bruen's 'surreal mind and unusual writing style' combined 'delightfully' to make it one of Berlins' top crime reads of 2017.
 
Alexander Starritt's debut, The Beast, is a hilarious and apt satire of tabloid journalism. A topic that seems more fitting with each year that passes, this year Mark Armory marked it as one of his favourites in the Spectator's round-up of the year's best reads.