21 Jun 2018 - 10:06

Today the sun rose in the United Kingdom at 4.43am and won't set until 9.31pm. This means that the UK will enjoy 16 hours and 38 minutes of sunlight, making today the longest day of the year. This day when the sun is at its highest point in the sky and the Earth's axis is most turned towards it is known as the summer solstice. For thousands of years, Pagans have celebrated both the summer and the winter solstices, which mark the dates of planting and harvesting, at Stonehenge. But why?

18 Jun 2018 - 10:06

The Battle of Waterloo was fought on Sunday 18th June 1815, 203 years ago today. A French army under the command of Napoleon Bonaparte was defeated by two of the armies of the Seventh Coalition: an Anglo-led allied army under the command of the Duke of Wellington, and a Prussian army under the command of Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, Prince of Wahlstatt. This resulted in Napoleon's exile to the remote island of Saint Helena and an unambiguous end to the First French Empire and the political and military career of one of the greatest commanders and statesmen in history.However, the victory at Waterloo was a narrow one, and perhaps should have belonged to the commander of a superb army of 128,000 troops with only seven losses amid the 60 battles he had fought.

In her new novel, False Lights, K. J. Whittaker imagines what might have happened had Napoleon emerged victorious from that fateful battle.

15 Jun 2018 - 12:06

With Father’s Day fast approaching (it’s this Sunday) we have put together a little list of books to help those looking for last minute gift inspiration! 

07 Jun 2018 - 01:06
It only seems like five minutes ago since we started the Zephyr list, but we're now just over a year old and what a fabulous year it has been!  We have launched several debut authors, published future classics from best-selling authors, received several brilliant accolades and seen our authors shortlisted for major prizes.  We really couldn't have asked for more!  And we hope that this has set the tone for many more years of Zephyr books.
 
And as we are this far in, we thought it might be a great time to introduce you to the full Zephyr team, plus get the team to talk about their favourite books from the list so far:
07 Jun 2018 - 06:06
The most prestigious of the cycling Grand Tours, the Tour de France is an annual multiple stage bicycle race primarily held in France. It was first held in 1903, and the 104th edition kicks off today with an individual time trial in Düsseldorf. 
05 Jun 2018 - 11:06

Happy World Environment Day! To celebrate and show our support, we’ve put together a list of our favourite books about the natural world…

29 May 2018 - 12:05

Author Alex Dahl walks through her gripping new novel, The Boy at the Door

18 May 2018 - 06:05

Ex-journalist Kay and her family are spending the summer in a rented farmhouse in Vermont. Kay is haunted by her traumatic past in Africa, and is struggling with her troubled marriage and the constraints of motherhood. Then her husband is called away unexpectedly on business and Kay finds herself alone with the children, obsessed by the idea that something terrible has happened to the owners of the house. The locals are reticent when she asks about their whereabouts; and she finds disturbing writing scrawled across one of the walls.

17 May 2018 - 07:05

Lorna Brown is an artist specialising in watercolour architectural paintings that represent something other than just bricks and mortar. With a keenness for adventure, she likes to hunt for new places to paint; buildings with character and story that represent the people who have occupied these spaces in the past, present and future.

Lorna has travelled around the world to produce this collection of illustrations of street art in urban landscapes. Visiting London, Bristol, Helsinki, Berlin, Cairo, Bethlehem, New York, Los Angeles, Detroit, Christchurch, Melbourne, Painted Cities demonstrates how the architecture shapes the unique street art in each city and tells the story of the painters and people who live there.

 

16 May 2018 - 06:05

Julia Kelly met a charismatic and successful artist, Charlie Whisker, while she was working on her first novel. He was twenty years older than her. Their relationship was passionate and extraordinary; each of them inspired the other. Their friends were writers, artists and rock stars; they lived a glamorous life of exhibitions, parties and concerts. They became parents to a daughter they adored.

But Charlie suddenly changed, becoming hopelessly forgetful, angry and confused. Matchstick Man is an unbearably honest, unsentimental and heartbreaking description of a brilliant man's mental disintegration and its effects on his family. Charlie's disturbing behaviour is described in a series of terrible, understated revelations. 

An unforgettable telling of a story that will be familiar to many thousands of people in the UK and Ireland.

15 May 2018 - 06:05

Hello all, we can’t quite believe that it has been a whole TWO years since we sprung up out of the ground and into the digital stratosphere… and what an amazing two years it has been.

Aria has published over one hundred books and sold more than two million units in this time – quite an achievement, if we do say so ourselves! 

In case any of you aren’t quite sure on all the particulars of us… we are Aria, a dynamic digital-first fiction imprint from award-winning independent publishers Head of Zeus. At heart, we’re avid readers committed to publishing exactly the kind of books we love to read — from romance and sagas to crime, thrillers and historical adventures.

14 May 2018 - 06:05

Laurie Canciani is the author of The Insomnia Museum.
I was only a few months through an MA in Creative Writing and I already wanted to quit. My partner was driving me to the train station at the time. I had the money in my hand ready to pay for the expensive journey that would get me all the way from South Wales to Bath and I’d read all the work necessary for the challenging seminars, but I decided it would be better, and easier, for me to quit. Luckily, my partner refused to take me back home and insisted I see the course through to the end, whatever the outcome. I was tired, overworked, and the minus sign next to my current account reflected the below-zero motivation I had to spend more money on something that I knew deep down wouldn’t work out. I went to the train station, got my ticket and forced myself to keep going. I didn’t know it then but quitting would’ve been the worst mistake I could’ve made. I went on to achieve a high grade, I won the coveted annual prize for the best work-in-progress of the year and I gained representation from a leading literary agency, which led to the publication of my debut novel The Insomnia Museum.

08 May 2018 - 06:05

The death of Dr David Kelly in 2003 is one of the strangest events in recent British history. This scrupulous scientist, an expert on weapons of mass destruction, was caught up in the rush to war in Iraq. He felt under pressure from those around Tony Blair to provide evidence that Saddam Hussein was producing weapons of mass destruction. Kelly seemed to have tipped into sudden depression when he was outed as a source for Andrew Gilligan.But the circumstances of his death are replete with disquieting questions – every detail, from his motives to the method of his death, his body’s discovery and the way in which the state investigated his demise, seems on close examination not to make sense. There was never a full coroner’s inquest into his death, which would have allowed medical and other evidence to be carefully interrogated. 

In An Inconvenient Death, Miles Goslett shows why we should be deeply sceptical of the official narrative and reminds us of the desperate measures those in power resorted to in that feverish summer of 2003.