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15 Sep 2016 - 12:09
Submitted by: Blake
The familiar face of Winston Churchill, caught in warlike pose, now stares sternly from the reverse of the Bank of England’s first plastic bank note, the new ‘fiver’  which became legal currency on 13 September. 
 
12 Sep 2016 - 06:09
Submitted by: Blake
First, a disclaimer: I have been known to abuse innocent metaphors. In some cases, I've been guilty of drawing them out and hammering them so thin that they dissipate in disgust. That being said, the opportunity to liken the launch of my new novel (which, even in its title, Bone Meal for Roses, includes a reference to growing things), to the opening of the first, spring sweet-pea bloom in the flowerbed outside the window where I write, is just too darn tempting to pass up. 
 

08 Sep 2016 - 03:09
Submitted by: Blake
Irish regiments’ and brigades’ exploits can be explored by reading any of the excellent non-fiction publications available on the Boer War, but the Royal Irish Regiment of Foot is a fictional unit, as is Belmont’s 21st Dragoons.
07 Sep 2016 - 04:09
Submitted by: Blake
The hot news just now is that yours truly is taking an extended break from crime fiction to launch a trilogy of World War Two thrillers.  The first, Finisterre, publishes in hardback on 1st December and the books to follow will feature what I've termed a "soft-linkage" between characters who flit in and out of the narrative as the plot demands.  This little device serves two purposes.  Firstly, it acts like an egg, binding together the series as a whole, thus giving me the chance to offer promising bit players an entire book of their own.  Secondly, it answers the now-universal call in publishing for books with series potential, rather than straightforward one-offs.  The title of this new trilogy?  The Wars Within.
06 Sep 2016 - 03:09
Submitted by: Blake

Thomas Levenson appeared on the BBC Inside Science show this week to discuss his book The Hunt for Vulcan. 

03 Sep 2016 - 10:09
Submitted by: Blake
Win a guitar with Head of Zeus & John and Carole Barrowman.
 
If Conjuror has encouraged you to start playing an instrument then Head of Zeus can make this happen. We’re giving away an electric guitar to one lucky winner who enters our Conjuror competition. 
 
03 Sep 2016 - 10:09
Submitted by: Blake

Daybreak on Wednesday 5th revealed the first signs that the Great Fire of London, after four days of horrendous damage, was beginning to extinguish itself. Somewhere around Pye Corner, by Cock Lane in Smithfield, the westward advance of the fire was halted. The diarist Samuel Pepys, looking out at the ruined city, described it as ‘the saddest sight of desolation that I ever saw; everywhere great fires, oil cellars and brimstone and other things burning.’

02 Sep 2016 - 07:09
Submitted by: Blake

Ken Liu, author of The Paper Menagerie and Grace of Kings, and translator of Cixin Liu’s award-winning Three-Body Problem series, is currently visiting the UK.

24 Aug 2016 - 05:08
Submitted by: Blake
Irish Americans saw the conflict of the Anglo-Boer War through their own eyes and very differently to those who might have seen support for the British in purely economic terms. Gold and diamonds were part of international trade and the Boers were considered too backward to be stewards of the world’s resources. The arguments and passions raged – pro-British, pro-Boer. Irish, Dutch and German Americans raised support and money for the Boers while a group of American women married to Englishmen raised forty thousand pounds to charter, equip and staff a hospital ship, the SS Maine.

22 Aug 2016 - 12:08
Submitted by: Blake
Our book of the week is The Last Horseman by David Gilman, an epic historical adventure set during the Boer War from the bestselling author of MASTER OF WAR.
 
Dublin, 1899. On a foul night in a troubled city,  lawyer Joseph Radcliffe watches the execution of a young Irish rebel. Radcliffe, together with his black American comrade Benjamin Pierce, has made a living defending the toughest cases in Dublin, but is haunted by the spectre of his defeats, the loss of his wife and child and his difficult relationship with his surviving son, Edward.
 
16 Aug 2016 - 03:08
Submitted by: Blake
The Boer War conflict of 1899-1902 embodied human drama, tragedy and heroism, but it also showed military and political folly on a grand scale. Like all great conflicts that can split communities and families there were Irishmen not only from the same county, city or town fighting each other in the Anglo-Boer War, but from the same neighbourhood. Echoes of the American Civil War.

15 Aug 2016 - 04:08
Submitted by: Blake
It has always been vital to me to make my fiction feel to the reader as if it is really happening,  even more involving than watching a TV series or a movie,  and that they are there,  inside the book,  as the story unfolds.