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25 Jul 2016 - 10:07
Submitted by: Blake

Our book of the week is Stonehenge by Francis Pryor. A concise, beautifully illustrated account of the history and archaeology of an iconic feature of the English landscape, from one of Britain’s most distinguished archaeologists.

18 Jul 2016 - 10:07
Submitted by: Blake

Our book of the week is Guilty Minds by Joseph Finder,  a new thriller from the New York Times bestseller.

Private spy Nick Heller is the best lie detector you'll ever meet. Trained in the special forces; tough, smart and stubborn, he'll do what needs to be done to uncover the truth.
 
11 Jul 2016 - 03:07
Submitted by: Blake

Our book of the week is The Woman of the Hour by Jane Lythell. A twisty drama of power, rivalry and betrayal set in the glamorous, pressurised world of a London TV station, from the author of The Lie of You.

08 Jul 2016 - 10:07
Submitted by: Blake
Head of Zeus held our first Twitter chat on Thursday 7th June 2016 with HoZ authors Clare Carson, author of Orkney Twilight and The Salt Marsh, and Lesley Thomson, author of The Detective’s Daughter series including the latest book, The House with No Rooms.  
 

07 Jul 2016 - 02:07
Submitted by: Blake
Laura Palmer, Editorial Director at Head of Zeus has bought World Rights (excluding Germany) for the second book in Jane Lythell’s StoryWorld series, from Gaia Banks at Sheil Land. 
 
04 Jul 2016 - 11:07
Submitted by: Blake
Our Book of the Week is Not the Chiclot Report by Peter Oborne, one of the country's leading political journalists giving his unoffical account on the Chilcot Inquiry. 
 
‘The defining calamity of the post-cold war era', in Peter Oborne’s words, took place in 2003. The invasion of Iraq led to the collapse of the state system in the Middle East. Iraq is shattered, Syria will never be put back together again, and Lebanon hasn’t functioned as a unified state for a long time. And the great wave of refugees unleashed by this breakdown is threatening what is left of democracy in Turkey and the very existence of the European Union.
01 Jul 2016 - 02:07
Submitted by: Blake

Head of Zeus will be hosting their first ever Twitter chat this Thursday, July 7th at 4pm. HoZ will be hosting the chat with author of The Detective's Daughters series, Lesley Thomson (@lesleyjmthomson) and Clare Carson (@clarecarsonpen), author of Orkney Twilight and The Salt Marsh which was published in June 2016.  The two authors will be discussing their respective series and writing, whilst answering questions posed from Twitter members.  Members can get involved by asking questions using the hashtag #HoZCrime and tweeting to Clare and Lesley from 4pm. 

30 Jun 2016 - 11:06
Submitted by: Blake

The carnage of the Great War had far more effect on world history than any other four-year period in the history of mankind. In the realms of geopolitics, economics, class, culture, nationalism, imperialism, colonialism, sexual liberation, female emancipation and the structure of society, the world after 1914 was so different from before it as almost to inhabit separate planets altogether. Of no nation was that more true than Britain, which is why these centenary commemorations will be much more than merely a time for historical reflection. They will also be a moment for Britons to look at themselves as a people, and consider quite how far we’ve come as a result of the wholesale slaughter.

27 Jun 2016 - 04:06
Submitted by: Blake

Today sees the UK release of The Fundamentals of Caring on Netflix, starring Paul Rudd, Craig Roberts and Selena Gomez. The film is an adaptation of the 2012 novel, The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving by New York Times bestselling author Jonathan Evison, which is published in the UK by Head of Zeus.

23 Jun 2016 - 11:06
Submitted by: Blake
Today is the anniversary of the joint coronation of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon in 1509.
 
The early Tudor world Henry and Catherine inhabited can seem impossibly distant from our own. It is a place of arcane rituals, where January is greeted with processions of ploughs and summer with bonfires and giants. Its calendar is strange too: a litany of endless saints days and a new year that starts in spring. And let’s not even get started on the clothes, which are proscribed so strictly by law that wearing the wrong socks could land a servant in the stocks.
 
20 Jun 2016 - 11:06
Submitted by: Blake
 Our Book of the Week is Lakeland by Hunter Davies, a beautiful gift for anyone who loves Lakeland, embellished with old prints and posters of the lakeland area.
16 Jun 2016 - 10:06
Submitted by: Blake

Today marks one of the most momentous events in the literary calendar, namely the two hundredth anniversary of the creation of Mary Shelley’s classic novel Frankenstein. The book came about in highly unusual circumstances. June 1816 was part of what was known as ‘The Year Without A Summer’, a painfully airless time interspersed with storms of terrifying ferocity. At the Villa Diodati by Lake Geneva in Switzerland, a loose group of writers and intellectuals took shelter and spent their days and nights discussing life, literature and love. These included the poets Lord Byron and Shelley, Shelley’s mistress Mary, her stepsister Claire Clairmont, and the physician (and occasional writer) John Polidori.

14 Jun 2016 - 12:06
Submitted by: Blake

I found the Lookers’ Hut by chance, walking around Romney Marsh. I knew the marsh from teenage trips in the early eighties, travelling south from London in a beaten-up Ford or on the back of a motorbike, heading for the coast as the sun dropped over the Channel. Marshland, a haunted place of shifting land and water, was where I wanted to set my second novel about Sam, the daughter of a spy who doesn’t know who to trust or where solid ground can be found. But I needed somewhere for Sam to hide and I wasn’t sure how anybody could vanish in the exposed plain of Romney. And so I went field walking, searching for a safe house.